Q: When and where is Camp Hobé?

A: Camp Hobé is held each June. Sessions are usually held the middle 2 weeks of the month, although the exact dates vary from year to year. We have three different sessions, grouped by camper age:

  • Day Camp / Hobé Juniors: 4–6 years old, 2-day program. The 4–5 year olds (Day campers) do not stay overnight; the 6-year olds (Hobé Juniors) may choose to stay overnight. This session may be able to accommodate older campers depending on space and the needs of the individual campers.
  • Kids Week: 7–11 years old, 5-day overnight program
  • Teen Week: 12–19 years old, 5-day overnight program

A: Camp Hobé is held at the beautiful Camp Wapiti site, which is located just outside Tooele, Utah. The campsite is approximately a 40-50 minute drive from downtown Salt Lake City.

Q: How do I know that Camp Hobé is a good program?

A: Camp Hobé has been accredited by the American Camp Association (ACA) for over 30 years. The ACA is the industry standard for best practices in camping programs. Accreditation means that our camp complies with up to 26 mandatory standards on critical health and safety concerns, as well as with 20 to 40 additional standards in each of 10 separate areas, including operations, facilities, staffing, programs, and aquatics. The accreditation process focuses on education and encourages camps to continually improve their programs.


Camp Hobé has been designated as a Gold Ribbon Camp by the Children’s Oncology Camp Association International for more than 5 years. This is the industry standard for best practices in oncology camping. In order to be a Gold Ribbon Camp, we must meet additional oncology- specific criteria beyond our ACA accreditation, including collaboration with our local children’s hospital.

Q: How is camp different from other patient support programs?

A: Camp Hobé has a commitment to patients with cancer and similarly treated disorders, and their siblings. We have set specific goals for how we want camp to help your children grow, including:

  • Goal #1: Give children with cancer (and similar disorders) and their siblings a place to “just be kids.”
  • What we see happening, or how we know it happens: Children with cancer (and similar disorders) and their siblings have the opportunity to participate in camp activities just like healthy children whose families are not affected by these illnesses. The camp program provides a high level of medical and psychosocial supervision to ensure that these children are safe both mentally and physically during the camp experience.
  • Goal #2: Give children the chance to build support systems with others living with chronic illness.
  • What we see happening, or how we know it happens: Using recreation and leisure skills, the camp staff provides a camping experience for children with cancer (& similar disorders) and their siblings who would otherwise not have this group experience.
    Siblings find support in knowing that others deal with the same issues that they do. During the calendar year, other organizations provide opportunities for children with cancer (& similar disorders) and their siblings to learn about their illness and to talk about it. Camp Hobé provides a break from illness, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, hospitals, and illness. Campers are not expected to talk about their disease experience while at camp, although we provide a supportive environment should they wish to do so. Discussions on these topics are facilitated when the campers start the conversations. Hobé Forever is an optional guided activity offered during camp where campers have time to remember friends who are not present that year. This activity gives campers the opportunity to express feelings of grief and loss if they desire. Camp staff members respect any requests for further counseling or discussion.
  • Goal #3: Encourage each camper to learn new skills and leisure activities by participating in small group and large group activities daily.
  • What we see happening, or how we know it happens: Campers rotate through activities such as arts & crafts, drama, archery,  swimming, and nature. They also take part in specialized challenge activities (Teen Week), a carnival, or Hobé Jam, an outdoor rock concert.
  • Goal #4: Offer opportunities for campers to learn about nature, ecology and their part in preserving the environment during recreation and outdoor living.
  • What we see happening, or how we know it happens: Specific topics about nature will be offered during the camp session. Each cabin group will be assigned chores, including cleaning the dining hall, shower/restrooms, grounds, and cabins. In addition, camp administration and kitchen staff discuss reducing food wastage and proper disposal of food, and encourage recycling dishes and other items as appropriate.
  • Goal #5: Help each camper develop socialization skills and new interests.
  • What we see happening, or how we know it happens: In addition to other program activities, each camper works with their cabin group to create and perform a skit and a cheer. The campers work together to set up behavior rules for their cabin area, with guidance from their cabin counselor. They sit together for meals and use the “buddy system” during activities and when moving between locations.
  • Goal #6: Give kids opportunities to develop leadership skills, and help them take these opportunities.
  • What we see happening, or how we know it happens: The campers work together to set up behavior rules for their cabin area, with guidance from their cabin counselor. Some activities give campers the chance to volunteer to be the “first” one to try it. Campers can also be leaders by following camp rules, and contributing to and participating in all activities. After campers reach the age of 16 years, they are eligible to be Counselors-in-Training and help staff with program activities or assist an adult counselor with a group of kids.